Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 17th Annual Congress on Pharmaceutics & Drug Delivery Systems Prague, Czech Republic | Panorama Hotel Prague | Milevská 7, 140 63 Praha.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Vaclav Vetvicka

University of Louisville, USA

Keynote: Beta glucan – new candidate for vaccines and drug delivery
Euro Pharmaceutics 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Vaclav Vetvicka photo
Biography:

Vaclav Vetvicka completed his PhD at the Institute of Microbiology in Prague. After working at the same institute as Researcher, he spent a year at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation in Oklahoma City. Since 1991, he is working at the Department of Pathology, University of Louisville, KY, USA. He published more than 260 scientific publications, 7 books and 8 international patents.

 

Abstract:

Beta-glucans have been studied extensively as an immune stimulant in anti-infective, anti-tumor immunity, immunoadjuvant in cancer therapy, wound healing, and for stress and the lowering of cholesterol. After a long long history of research, mechanisms of glucan actions are now established and the role of various receptors such as CR3 and Dectin-1 and subsequent signaling is clear. With recent studies showing stimulation of humoral immunity including antibody response, it is clear that glucan-mediated immunotherapy may link both innate and adaptive immune responses. In addition, glucan is similarly active in all animal species including humans.

            One possibility is to use glucan in an immunocyte-targeting delivery system, which is particularly advantageous for therapeutic DNA or RNA. Similar approach uses glucan particles encapsulating various bacterial antigens. Another option is the development of vaccines, where glucan can substitute aluminium and offer higher immunostimulation. As glucan is similarly active when administered orally or parenteraly, glucans can improve immunogenicity of oral vaccines.

Glucans act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns and recognize specific receptors on immune cells, followed by triggering innate immunity and regulating adaptive immunity. What is more, glucans are safe and biodegradable without tissue deposits. Therefore, glucan-based compounds and formulations are significant vaccine adjuvant candidates, as it is clear that the glucans might offer an ideal solution – they are inexpensive, generally free from side effects and capable of significant biological effects.

 

Euro Pharmaceutics 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Valery Bochkov photo
Biography:

Valery Bochkov got his PhD degree in biochemistry from the Cardiology Research Center in Moscow, Russia, followed by postdoc research at the Basel University Hospitals in Switzerland. Since 2000 he performed research on biology of oxidized lipids at the Institute of Vascular Biology and Thrombosis Research at the Medical University of Vienna. Since 2014 Valery Bochkov is Professor of Molecular Pharmaceutics at the Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Graz, Austria. He has published 125+ papers in peer-reviewed journals

Abstract:

Oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs) represent an emerging class of lipid mediators generated by enzymatic or non-enzymatic oxidation of esterified polyunsaturated fatty acids. Multiple studies have characterized OxPLs as inducers of proinflammatory, procoagulant and proangiogenic mediators in a variety of cells and tissues. Accumulating evidence suggests that OxPLs induce these proteins through signaling pathways that are different from those utilized by the majority of physiological or pathological inducers of inflammation, blood clotting and angiogenesis. This presentation will discuss specific intracellular signaling mechanisms mediating induction of interleukin-8, tissue factor and VEGF by OxPLs. As a proof of principle for selective inhibition of OxPL-induced inflammation a new chemical scaffold will be described that selectively inhibits production of interleukin-8 by OxPLs but has minimal effects on the action of recognized inflammatory agonists such as cytokines (TNFa, IL-1b) or bacterial products (lipopolysaccharide). The study suggests new approaches for pharmacological protection against oxidative stress using non-antioxidant compounds.

 

Keynote Forum

Qiang Zhou

Peking University, China

Keynote: Targeting NMDA Subtype glutamate in brain diseases
Euro Pharmaceutics 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Qiang Zhou photo
Biography:

After finishing his B.S at Tsinghua University and MS at University of Pittsburgh, Dr. Zhou received his Ph.D in Neurobiology at State University of New York Stony Brook. He was a post-doctoral fellow in UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley, an assistant professor of neuroology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and a scientist at Genentech. Currently he is a professor in School of Chemical Biology and Biotechnology at Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School. His major focus is the biological basis of brain disease mechnaims and drug discovery at the perclinical stage.

 

Abstract:

NMDA subtype glutamate receptors play critical roles in the refinement of neural connections during development and learning and memory functions in the adult. Their excessive activation is also believed to have critical contributions to neuronal death under pathological/neurodegenerative conditions, while hypofunction is propsoed to undelie the oncogenesis of certain psychiatric diseases. In this talk, I will discuss our recent efforts in enhancing NMDAR function for treating psychiatric diseases (such as schizophrenia) and inhibiting their activation in treating neurodegenerative diseases (such as Alzheimer’s). For the former approach, we have screened large amount of compounds and identified a few series of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs), and I will discuss their mode of action (such as GluN2A selectivity) and unique and interesting properties. For the latter, I will discuss our evaluation of GluN2B-selective antagonists in Alzheimer’s disease model mice and their therapeutic potentials. I will also briefly discuss the pros and cons of trageting NMDARs in treating brain diseases.

 

Euro Pharmaceutics 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Raid G. Alany photo
Biography:

Professor Raid Alany is a registered New Zealand Pharmacist with a PhD from the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. He is the Inagural Head of School of Life Sciences, Pharmacy and Chemistry at Kingston University London, UK; holds an honorary professorship at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. He is the Editor-in-Chief of Pharmaceutical Development and Technology (Taylor and Francis) and Past President of the New Zealand Chapter of the Controlled Release Society. Raid’s research is on ophthalmic drug delivery, lipid and surfactant-based systems, in-situ gels and animal health. He holds international patents that have been commercialized in New Zealand and Australia where he consults for animal health companies, regulatory bodies and IP-specialized law firms. His ResearchGate score is 39.23 and his h-index is 23 (google scholar).

 

Abstract:

Aging is associated with drastic optical and biochemical changes in the eye often leading to a decline in visual acuity where vision worsens. Such eye disorders impose a financial burden on the health sector worldwide. Recent estimates of the global cost of sight loss -up to the year 2010- suggest an annual figure of over US$3 trillion (£2.4 trillion).  The main disorders leading to sight loss are cataract, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy. Pharmaceutical formulation and drug delivery research has introduced promising eye treatments into the market; nevertheless, there remain unmet clinical needs and limitations associated with performance of conventional ocular dosage forms like eye drops and ointments. Compromised adherence and/or persistence with conventional eye drops that are applied topically to the surface of the eye is primarily related to the need to be applied once, twice (or even up to four times) daily, often as a combination of multiple drugs, to achieve their intended purpose. The intravitreal injection of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for AMD treatment requires clinical intervention every 4-8 weeks. Therefore, achieving therapeutics drug concentrations at the target site and maintaining such concentration over extended time intervals with minimal undesirable effects, offer renewed opportunities for ophthalmic product research and development, especially when using already approved drugs with well-established safety and efficacy profiles. This talk will review and provide insights withdrawn from our own research on ophthalmic drug delivery systems that are aimed at age-related eye disorders such as dry eye, glaucoma, corneal keratophathy and cataract. Phase-transition microemulsion, in-situ gelling systems, polymeric and inorganic nanoparticles, personalised ocular inserts and modified contact lenses are amongst the delivery system that we have researched over the past two decades.